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Contact | Secretariaat
Martine Pollier
Zandstraat 324, 8200 Brugge
T +32 50 322 420
info@archipelvzw.be

Trip

Brutalist London

In search of forgotten pearls
31.05 02.06
London

3 days with 2 nights:
990 € pp based on a double room
1 145 € pp based on a single room (+ 155 € pp)

Minimum 40 / maximum 60 participants.

more info

With the support of:

Brutalism is back hip. Buildings once dismissed as ugly are making a comeback. These buildings with their intimidating concrete ‘look’ and severe forms were long maligned and threatened with demolition. Brutalist architecture is experiencing a renaissance today. People everywhere are rising up for the preservation of some of the world’s most iconic buildings. And these voices are ringing louder and prouder than ever.

Arnout Fonck Robin Hood Gardens – Alison and Peter Smithson, 1972

In spring 2024, Archipel moves to London!

A post-war architectural style characterised by ‘massive’ raw concrete with a heavy texture (béton brut) and angular, geometric shapes, Brutalism flourished between the mid-1950s and 1970s. While Brutalism has its roots in modernism, it emerged as a movement against the architectural mainstream. It emphasised materials, textures and construction, as well as functionality and equality. Brutalist architects challenged traditional notions of what a building should look like and showed the building as it was in all its structural honesty.

Programme

When it comes to Brutalist architecture, London is home to some of the finest examples:

Arnout Fonck Alexandra & Ainsworth Estate – Neave Brown for the Camden Architects’ Department, 1978


Arnout Fonck Balfron Tower – Ernő Goldfinger, 1967


Arnout Fonck Barbican Centre – Chamberlin Powell and Bon, 1965


Arnout Fonck Bermondsey tube station – Ian Ritchie Architects, 1999

Alexandra & Ainsworth Estate – Neave Brown for the Camden Architects’ Department, 1978
Balfron Tower – Ernő Goldfinger, 1967
Barbican Centre – Chamberlin Powell and Bon, 1965
Bermondsey tube station – Ian Ritchie Architects, 1999

Arnout Fonck Brixton Recreation Centre – George Finch for Lambeth Borough Council, 1974


Arnout Fonck Brunswick Centre – Patrick Hodgkinson, 1972


Arnout Fonck Canterbury house


Arnout Fonck Centre Point – George Marsh of the architects R. Seifert and Partners, 1966

Brixton Recreation Centre – George Finch for Lambeth Borough Council, 1974
Brunswick Centre – Patrick Hodgkinson, 1972
Canterbury house
Centre Point – George Marsh of the architects R. Seifert and Partners, 1966

Arnout Fonck Churchill Gardens – Philip Powell and Hidalgo Moya (Powell & Moya Architect Practice), 1946


Arnout Fonck City of London information centre


Arnout Fonck City skyline


Arnout Fonck Cotton Gardens estate

Churchill Gardens – Philip Powell and Hidalgo Moya (Powell & Moya Architect Practice), 1946
City of London information centre
City skyline
Cotton Gardens estate

Arnout Fonck Daily Express former building – Ellis and Clark, 1932


Arnout Fonck Dirty Lane


Arnout Fonck Dowgate Fire Station – Hubbard Ford and Partners, 1976


creative commons Economist Building – Alison and Peter Smithson, 1959-1964

Daily Express former building – Ellis and Clark, 1932
Dirty Lane
Dowgate Fire Station – Hubbard Ford and Partners, 1976
Economist Building – Smithson Plaza – Alison and Peter Smithson, 1964

Arnout Fonck Hayward Gallery – Greater London Council Architects’ Department under the leadership of Norman Engleback, 1968


Arnout Fonck Housden house – Brian Housden, 1965


Arnout Fonck Imperial Hotel – C. Lovett Gill & Partners, 1970


Arnout Fonck IOE, UCL’s Faculty of Education and Society – Sir Denys Lasdun

Hayward Gallery – Greater London Council Architects’ Department under the leadership of Norman Engleback, 1968
Housden house – Brian Housden, 1965
Imperial Hotel – C. Lovett Gill & Partners, 1970
IOE, UCL’s Faculty of Education and Society – Sir Denys Lasdun

Arnout Fonck Lillington Gardens Community Centre – Roger Westman and Darbourne & Darke, 1961


Arnout Fonck Marshall Building London School of Economics – Grafton Architects, 2022


Arnout Fonck Ministry of Justice – Fitzroy Robinson & Partners with Basil Spence, 1976


Arnout Fonck National Theatre – Sir Denys Lasdun, 1977

Lillington Gardens Community Centre – Roger Westman and Darbourne & Darke, 1961
Marshall Building London School of Economics – Grafton Architects, 2022
Ministry of Justice – Fitzroy Robinson & Partners with Basil Spence, 1976
National Theatre – Sir Denys Lasdun, 1977

Arnout Fonck Newport Street Gallery – Caruso St John Architects, 2015


Arnout Fonck Paul Smith – 6a architects, 2013


Arnout Fonck Perronet House – Sir Roger Walters KBE, 1969


Arnout Fonck Plot 10 Community Play Project – Adam Khan Architects, 2020

Newport Street Gallery – Caruso St John Architects, 2015
Paul Smith – 6a architects, 2013
Perronet House – Sir Roger Walters KBE, 1969
Plot 10 Community Play Project – Adam Khan Architects, 2020

Arnout Fonck Queen Elizabeth Hall


Arnout Fonck Robin Hood Gardens – Alison and Peter Smithson, 1972


Arnout Fonck Royal College of Art – Herzog & de Meuron, 2021


Arnout Fonck Royal College of Physicians – Sir Denys Lasdun, 1964

Queen Elizabeth Hall
Robin Hood Gardens – Alison and Peter Smithson, 1972
Royal College of Art – Herzog & de Meuron, 2021
Royal College of Physicians – Sir Denys Lasdun, 1964

Arnout Fonck Smithfield market


Arnout Fonck Southwyck House Estate


Arnout Fonck Space House – George March for R. Seifert and Partners, 1968


Arnout Fonck St Alphage High Walk

Smithfield market
Southwyck House Estate
Space House One Kemble Street – George March for R. Seifert and Partners, 1968
St Alphage High Walk

Arnout Fonck St Giles London – A St Giles Hotel – Elsworth Sykes, 1977


Arnout Fonck Standard hotel – Shawn Hausman Design, 1970


Arnout Fonck Stangate house – William Fowler Howitt, 1964


Arnout Fonck Stockwell Bus Garage – George Adie and Frederick Button (Adie Button and Partners) with Thomas Bilbow, 1952

St Giles London – A St Giles Hotel – Elsworth Sykes, 1977
Standard hotel – Shawn Hausman Design, 1970
Stangate house – William Fowler Howitt, 1964
Stockwell Bus Garage – George Adie and Frederick Button (Adie Button and Partners) with Thomas Bilbow, 1952

Arnout Fonck Tate Modern


Arnout Fonck Trellick Tower – Ernő Goldfinger, 1972


Arnout Fonck Willow Road – Ernő Goldfinger, 1939

Tate Modern
Trellick Tower – Ernő Goldfinger, 1972
Willow Road – Ernő Goldfinger, 1939

Participation

Cost Price

Known Archipel formula:
3 days with 2 nights:
990 € pp based on a double room
1 145 € pp based on a single room (+ 155 € pp)

When registering, a preference can be passed on to share a room. As long as no traveller with the same request presents himself, he is registered on the basis of a single room with supplement. If a roommate cancels the trip after confirmation, the single supplement remains payable by the person travelling.

Included

Transportation
  • Thalys to and from London – departure from Brussels South/Midi
  • Local transfers
  • Rental bikes (subject to change)
Accommodations
  • Room with breakfast in a ***hotel
Other
  • Entrance to museums and buildings of the program
  • The Archipel – tour guide
  • The travel guide + photo booklet participants
  • Exclusive guides and explanations where possible
  • Audiophones
  • A travel assistance insurance (caution: this is not a cancellation insurance !)
Not included
  • Lunch and evening meals
  • Cancellation insurance (please contact your own insurance for this)

Enrol

Fill in the registration form on the Archipel website.

After your registration, PLANOPLI bvba will send you an order form. You return a signed and dated copy and pay the advance of 500 € per person as confirmation of your participation on account BE04 7360 5669 3231 of PLANOPLI bvba with the mention ‘London’ + name of participant(s).
This transfer makes your registration final.
Upon registration you accept the travel conditions mentioned in the program and confirm that Archipel is not responsible in case of any accidents.

Membership
Being or becoming a member of Archipel is the condition for participating in our architectural tours.
Renew your membership or become a member 2024.

Package Travel Act & Insurance
The change in the Package Travel Act of July 1, 2018 now affects travel insurance as well.
For group travel, this means that from January 1, 2020, travel assistance, cancellation and baggage insurance are no longer available on a group basis.
Only on an individual basis; for this, it is best to contact your own insurance company.

Cancellation costs
See special travel conditions article 13 of Planopli bvba.

PLANOPLI bvba is our partner in travel organization.